You are here: Home Projects The Guantánamo Testimonials Project Testimonies Testimonies of the Defense Department Sadkhan: Allegations of Abuse, ARB, 2005
Document Actions

Sadkhan: Allegations of Abuse, ARB, 2005

Detainee: You [the Review Board] are going to have some classified information. I complained to the General about the interrogators. I will talk in from of the members of the ARB, but I will not talk to the interrogators because they [the interrogators] tried to kill me.

Presiding Officer: Which interrogator tried to kill you?

Detainee: The interrogator who was a male, his name was [REDACTED]. The interrogator who was a female, her name was [REDACTED].

Presiding Officer: Where did this take place?

Detainee: Here, at Guantanamo Bay. I got my arm broken because of them [referring to the interrogators].

Board Member: When did this occur?

Detainee: Seven or eight months ago.

Presiding Officer: Were you treated for this injury? Where you sent to a hospital?

Detainee: Yes. My arm was taken care of. But this attack was planned [by the interrogators]. The interrogators took a Saudi guy and put him in the same room with me.

Presiding Officer: Two American interrogators, a male and female, beat you and broke your arm? Who is [REDACTED]?

Detainee: No, the interrogators were the cause, the reason I got my arm broken [REDACTED] is an interrogator [REDACTED] is an interrogator. The interrogators planned this attack [for me to be attacked and to get my arm broken] by putting the Saudi man alone with me in the same room.

Presiding Officer: Did either of the American interrogators,  [REDACTED] [or] [REDACTED] physically hurt you?

Detainee: I presented them [REDACTED] and [REDACTED] with information about this Saudi detainee [the Saudi who broke my arm]. [REDACTED] and [REDACTED] went to the detainee and told him that I had given them information about him.

Presiding Officer: What is the name of the prisoner who hurt you?

Detainee: His name is Jamil.

[…]

Detainee: The officers of the Army, they were there at the time [the attack happened]. The Army Officers told me to defend myself.

[…]

Board Member: You stated that someone witnessed the attack when your arm was broken, is that correct?

Detainee: Yes. The first time when I was beat, the Block Sergeant was there. After that the officers came. The Block Sergeant was the one who told me to defend myself. The same person who attacked me, the week prior to the attack, I had given interrogators information about him (pp. 20411-20413).



But the reason for the conflict between the prisoners and me is because first I am chiite and most of those prisoners are wahhabist and they allow the distinction of chia(h) and the hatred we have is well ancient religious hatred. The second reason is because I was cooperative with the interrogators and presented information against the Arabs present here. What confirm my conduct and behavior is when the Arabs tried to kill me in cell echo, one of them Saudi named Jamil entered and start beating me and did not retaliate until I got the permission from the military guard responsible of the block for self defense. Actually I defend[ed] my self until I place him down many times but I listen to the American soldiers and I stopped beating him and let him go then he got up and attacked me again, I had to defend myself until put him down. In this situation many officers from the American army were present and if you ask them about my situation, they will all testify in my favor. I am peaceful man and I don't like wrongdoing even my enemy who tried to kill me even though I had a great opportunity to do so and also you have this situation in pictures […] I do not hate America and I exposed myself and my family to danger many times in order to stand by and help America. Even in Cuba I put myself in danger by presenting information to the interrogators and of course some prisoners tried to kill me but thanks to God I got rid of them but with a sorrow they broke my right wriest [sic] and now I really am unable to use my right hand completely (pp. 20428 - 20429).


Personal tools