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Former Ghost Detainee at Guantánamo to Receive Lawyers. CCR Files Visit Request to See Client in Early October

Synopsis

On September 28, 2007, attorneys with the Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) filed a visit request with the Defense Department to see their client, Majid Khan, who was transferred one year ago from secret CIA detention to Guantánamo.

Two attorneys from the Center received Top Secret SCI clearance this week, higher than many members of the military who conducted the detainees’ Combatant Status Review Tribunals (CSRT’s), and expect to finally meet their client after a year of fighting for access. The request was made for visits either the week of October 8 or the week of November 5.

Said CCR attorney Wells Dixon, “We are glad the government finally agrees that Majid is entitled to immediate access to his counsel, and we fully expect they will approve our pending visit request and allow us access to him in Guantánamo within a few weeks.”

Majid Khan wrote by hand at the bottom of a form offering to have the American Bar Association help him retain counsel, “I think I already have a lawyer at CCR, but I never received any official letters from my lawyers (Gitanjali S. Gutierrez)… Please send me a lawyer or representative who can brief me with my options. Also please, if you can send me basic introduction criminal law books with all law terms, etc. Also I would like to know what has media said about me and full copy of tribunal CSRT about me, which was available on the Internet. (Thanks in advance).”

Said Shayana Kadidal, Managing Attorney of the Center for Constitutional Rights Guantánamo Global Justice Initiative, “What is disturbing about the form given to the detainees is the way the government is trying to make a fundamentally flawed process look legitimate by invoking the name of the American Bar Association. The Detainee Treatment Act review is so limited it doesn’t even come close to a substitute for habeas corpus.”

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